Volume 4 Supplement 1

Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control: Abstracts from the 3rd International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC 2015)

Open Access

Teaching good infection control practices with fun: impact of the serious game Flu.0

  • A-G Venier1,
  • S Marie2,
  • T Duroux1,
  • C Bervas1 and
  • P Parneix1
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control20154(Suppl 1):I10

DOI: 10.1186/2047-2994-4-S1-I10

Published: 16 June 2015

Introduction

Flu outbreaks usually reveal that practices and knowledge about the diagnosis of influenza, its treatment and infection control measures must be improved. A serious game, “Flu.0”, was created to teach the 8 key points to know and do when facing one or more patient infected by influenza.

Objectives

To evaluate the impact of playing to ‘Flu.0’ on the knowledge and practices of nurses and physicians.

Methods

Flu.0 is free and can be played online or downloaded; A call for participation to play and evaluate the game was performed. Players were asked to complete a questionnaire before and after the game to give their opinion on sentences about flu, to write what they learned with the game and the main thing they would do differently. A descriptive analysis was performed and the evolution of the answers was analysed.

Results

Physicians were 264 to participate (including 213 fellows), senior nurses 62 and nurses students 577; 95% learnt at least something. The main knowledge acquired was about rapid test for influenza (32%) and additional precautions (19%). Significantly, players agreed more after the game that seasonal flu is a not benign disease, that flu vaccination of health care workers is useful, knew more about antiviral treatment and felt better prepared to face a flu case (p<0.001). Thanks to the game 47% of physician/senior nurses and 80% of nurses students declared they would perform better additional precautions.

Conclusion

A serious game is an innovative quick and efficient tool for infection control team to improve patient safety.

Disclosure of interest

None declared.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
CCLIN SUD-OUEST
(2)
ARLIN Limousin

Copyright

© Venier et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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