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Table 2 AMR statement responses of (i) all respondents, (ii) German/Dutch physicians, and (iii) German/Dutch nurses, including p-values of differences between nationalities

From: Cross-border comparison of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and AMR prevention measures: the healthcare workers’ perspective

Statements All respondents (n = 574) Physicians (n = 177) Nurses (n = 397)
DE
(n = 305)
NL
(n = 269)
P-value DE (n = 128) NL
(n = 49)
P-value DE
(n = 177)
NL
(n = 220)
P-value
Mean Mean Mean Mean Mean Mean
AMR is a problem for … the general population. 4.2 4.6 ≤0.001 4.3 4.5 0.026 4.1 4.6 ≤0.001
nursing homes. 4.3 4.4 0.968 4.4 4.4 0.851 4.3 4.4 0.859
our hospital. 4.4 4.6 0.043 4.3 4.6 0.180 4.4 4.6 0.262
my patients. 4.2 4.5 0.002 4.2 4.3 0.281 4.3 4.5 0.017
One of the leading causes of AMR is … the use of antibiotics in farming animals. 4.5 3.6 ≤0.001 4.4 4.0 0.004 4.5 3.5 ≤0.001
the use of antibiotics by patients. 3.4 3.6 0.011 3.2 3.6 0.021 3.5 3.6 0.379
the admission of nursing home patients. 2.6 2.4 0.006 2.6 2.5 0.254 2.6 2.4 0.027
I believe that … antibiotics are prescribed at the request of patients. 2.9 2.4 ≤0.001 3.0 2.4 0.013 2.8 2.3 0.001
antibiotic prescriptions should be based on lab results. 4.4 3.9 ≤0.001 4.4 3.9 ≤0.001 4.4 3.9 ≤0.001
I am sufficiently informed about the diagnostic policy. 3.6 3.4 0.002 3.6 3.8 0.791 3.6 3.3 0.003
broad spectrum antibiotics should be provided when there is doubt of an infection. 1.7 2.2 ≤0.001 1.5 1.5 0.001 1.9 2.3 ≤0.001
I can contribute sufficiently to limit AMR. 3.6 2.8 ≤0.001 4.3 4.3 ≤0.001 3.1 2.6 ≤0.001
  1. Note. When there is a statistically significant difference between nationalities, the nationality with the highest mean is shown in bold. DE Germany, NL The Netherlands