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  • Open Access

P126: Direct observation survey of practice of alcohol-based handrubbing in Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal

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Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control20132 (Suppl 1) :P126

https://doi.org/10.1186/2047-2994-2-S1-P126

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Training Program
  • Teaching Hospital
  • Direct Observance
  • Body Fluid
  • Nursing Staff

Introduction

Health care-associated infections (HCAI) result essentially from cross-transmission of pathogenic microorganisms by the hands of healthcare workers (HCW). Their care represents a universal challenge in practice.

Objectives

Our study aimed to measure HCW compliance with hand hygiene.

Methods

We conducted a direct observance of hand hygiene compliance of HCW over a period of three months, based on the WHO’s “five indications of the hand hygiene” approach.

Results

For a total of 338 opportunities, the rate of global observance of hand hygiene was 36.1% with 80.3% of handrubbing realized. According to the department, this rate of observance was variable: Pneumology (42.3%), Thoracic Surgery and Cardiovascular (58.6%), Neurology (20%), Neurosurgery (24%), Emergency (25%), Laboratories (30%), Infectious diseases (39%), Psychiatry (33.3%), ORL (25%), Oral department (44.4%). According to the professional category, the observance was the following one: doctors (50.6%), nurses (34%) auxiliaries (29.1%) other nursing staffs (43.8%). The level of use of Alcohol-based handrub (ABHR) during hand hygiene was: auxiliaries (93%), doctors (82.1%), nurses (75.8%), others (14.3%). The observance of ABHR according to "five indications" was 87.7% before patient contact, of 83.3% before aseptic procedure, 44.4% after a risk of body fluid exposure, of 78% after patient contact and of 100% to the immediate surroundings of patient.

Conclusion

Observance of hand hygiene with ABHR is still low in the structure. A training program coupled with a sharing experience of outcomes of the survey should allow to improve it.

Disclosure of interest

None declared

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Infectious Diseases department, FANN teaching hospital, Dakar, Senegal
(2)
Service of control and prevention, HUG, Geneva, Switzerland
(3)
WHO, Geneva, Switzerland

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