Volume 4 Supplement 1

Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control: Abstracts from the 3rd International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC 2015)

Open Access

How to keep alive the “Clean Your Hands” campaign in a hospital setting: six years after

  • I Neves1, 2,
  • D Peres1,
  • F Vieira1 and
  • I Devesa1
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control20154(Suppl 1):P146

https://doi.org/10.1186/2047-2994-4-S1-P146

Published: 16 June 2015

Introduction

The hand hygiene is the most important practice to prevent healthcare associated infection. Portugal joined the WHO “SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands” campaign in October 2008, having developed a national strategy supplying training and didactic tools, providing a database and economic incentives to participating hospitals.

Objectives

Promotion of persistent good practices in hand hygiene.

Methods

The implementation of the campaign in this acute care 400 bed hospital was coordinated by the Infection Control and Antimicrobial Resistance Unit and focused on the following actions: (1) formal commitment signed by the administration head and the medical/nurse units heads; (2) implementation of multimodal strategy campaign; (3) audits and correction measures to structural conditions of the units (for example: existence of alcohol-based handrub – ABHR at the point of care); (4) infection control link professionals observer training (replicated in each unit) and subsequent observational study before/after the campaign in 2009 and then annually; (5) annual celebration of Hand Hygiene Day (5 of May) with presentation of small films and games, lectures and poster competition. Results are annually revealed, with benchmarking between units, specific interventions in units with lower compliance rates and compliance rates inclusion in its performance indicators.

Results

Compliance rates of 61,3%, 74.7% and 78.6% before, after campaign in 2009 and 2014, respectively. In the “first moment”: 53,8%, 69.5% and 73,5 respectively. All the professional categories showed improvement. The ABHR consumption increased from 20,2 in 2010 to 31,3 L/1000 patient-days in 2014.

Conclusion

A national strategy was fundamental to the implementation of the local campaigns. Contributing factors to this success included a national database with real time results (to motivate professionals); performance indicators (to motivate head units) and continuous tools to remember the good practice, keeping alive the campaign.

Disclosure of interest

None declared.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Infection Control and Antimicrobial Resistance Unit, Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos
(2)
Infetious Diseases Unit, Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos

Copyright

© Neves et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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