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  • Poster presentation
  • Open Access

The role of the mobile communication devices in the spread of healthcare-associated infections: a systematic review

  • 1 and
  • 2
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control20154 (Suppl 1) :P39

https://doi.org/10.1186/2047-2994-4-S1-P39

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Systematic Review
  • Staphylococcus Aureus
  • Prevention Measure
  • English Language
  • Full Text

Introduction

Mobile communication devices of healthcare workers have an invaluable feature of communication within hospital settings, and they may support aspects of clinical diagnosis and education. However, there may be a potential for contamination with various pathogens.

Objectives

Our objective was to systematically review the potential role of these devices in the dissemination of pathogens and the effective prevention measures.

Methods

A comprehensive literature search was performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. To identify relevant publications, PubMed, Medline and ScienceDirect were searched for articles published between 1 January 2000 and 1 August 2014 in English language. Appropriate articles were accessed in full text to determine eligibility and extract data by two reviewers. Studies were stratified by pathogens and prevention measures.

Results

Our search yielded 11,824 titles published after the search period. Finally, 30 articles met our inclusion criteria. Only 8% of healthcare workers routinely cleaned their mobile communication devices which resulting a high rate of contamination (40-100%). Coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus were the most common identified bacteria. The most of them was methicillin resistant (10-95.3%).

Conclusion

This systematic review identified effective interventions to reduce bacterial contamination risks include regularly decontamination of mobile communication devices, hand hygiene and staff education.

Disclosure of interest

None declared.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Hygiene, National Center for Epidemiology, Budapest, Hungary
(2)
School of PH.D. Studies, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

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