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Table 2 Colonization of Italian LTCF residents and staff with MRSA and multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae

From: Review on colonization of residents and staff in Italian long-term care facilities by multidrug-resistant bacteria compared with other European countries

Province, year No. of residents (R), staff (S), LTCFs (L) included Mean age in years/female % Specimen types Residents, colonizationwith MDR (%) Staff, colonization with MDR (%) Referencesa
Bergamo, 2005 R (88), S (51), L (1) 83/80 Nasal MRSA (19.3) MRSA (5.8) [39]
Vicenza, 2006 R (551), L (2) 83/73 Nasal MRSA (7.8)   [62]
Various provincesb, 2006 R (221), L (23) 83/61 Catheter urine ESBL/AmpC (54.0)   [22]
Bolzano, 2008c R (111), S (69), L (1) 84/55 Rectal, inguinal, oro-pharyngeal, nasal, urine ESBL (64.0)
AmpC (4.5)
Carbapenemase VIM-1 (6.3)
MRSA (38.7)
VRE (2.7)
ESBL (14.5) AmpC (1.5)
Carbapenemase VIM (1.5)
MRSA (14.5)
[13]
Bolzano, 2012c R (131), S (57), L (2) 83/60 Rectal, inguinal, oro-pharyngeal, nasal, urine ESBL (49.0)
AmpC (2.9)
Carbapenemase VIM-1 (1.5)
MRSA (13.2)
ESBL (5.2)
AmpC (0.0)
Carbapenemase VIM (0.0)
MRSA (7.0)
[14]
Various provincesd, 2015 R (489), L (12) 85/69 Rectal, nasal, axillary ESBL (57.3) Carbapenemase KPC-3/VIM-1 (1.0) MRSA (17.2)   [23]
  1. aAll studies are point prevalence studies; b 70 % Northern Italy, 5 % Central Italy, 25 % Southern Italy; c one of the LTCFs was screened in 2008 and 2012; carbapenemase screening was done on chromogenic ESBL agar plates; d 50 % Northern Italy, 50 % Central Italy